Cover of: American women regionalists, 1850-1910 | Read Online
Share

American women regionalists, 1850-1910

  • 383 Want to read
  • ·
  • 25 Currently reading

Published by W.W. Norton in New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • United States

Subjects:

  • American literature -- Women authors,
  • Regionalism -- United States -- Literary collections,
  • Women -- United States -- Literary collections,
  • American literature -- 19th century

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statement[edited by] Judith Fetterley, Marjorie Pryse.
ContributionsFetterley, Judith, 1938-, Pryse, Marjorie, 1948-
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPS508.W7 A48 1992
The Physical Object
Paginationxx, 648 p. ;
Number of Pages648
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL1533810M
ISBN 100393961370
LC Control Number91011583

Download American women regionalists, 1850-1910

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

Marjorie Pryse is a professor of English and women's studies at the University at Albany, SUNY. Among her books are American Women Regionalists, A Norton Anthology, coedited with Judith Fetterley, and Conjuring: Black Women, Fiction, and Literary Tradition, coedited with Hortense by: Get this from a library! American women regionalists, [Judith Fetterley; Marjorie Pryse;]. American Women Regionalists includes a general introduction that suggests lines of influence among the writers included in the anthology and places regionalism in the context of American literary history. The editors have also provided notes to the texts, biographical / critical prefaces for each author, and selected bibliographies/5(22). All about American Women Regionalists A Norton Anthology by Judith Fetterley. LibraryThing is a cataloging and social networking site for booklovers4/5.

  So what would it have been for women trying to raise their voices through literature back then? Our extensive research got us a great number of books on the subject. One of the titles that caught our attention (that came close to what we were looking for) was American Women Regionalists: A Norton Anthology. We thought of giving it a read and. A vibrant tradition—long neglected—is brought back to readers in this generous and rich collection., American Women Regionalists, A Norton Anthology, Judith Fetterley, Marjorie Pryse, In American Women Regionalists readers will find writing that charts the imagination and talent of some of our most compelling voices. Included in the collection are works by New Englanders Mary E. Wilkins Freeman and Sarah Orne Jewett, Tennessean Mary Noailles Murfree, New Orleans writers Kate Chopin and Alice Dunbar-Nelson, Native American. American literary regionalism or local color is a style or genre of writing in the United States that gained popularity in the mid to late 19th century into the early 20th century. In this style of writing, which includes both poetry and prose, the setting is particularly important and writers often emphasize specific features such as dialect, customs, history, and landscape, of a particular.

  American Women Regionalists includes sketches and short fictions generally published between and , with the exception of the opening sketch by Harriet Beecher Stowe, "Uncle Lot" (), and the closing story by Cather, "Old Mrs. Harris" (). As we will discuss in more detail in chapter 3, "Uncle Lot" stands as one of the preliminary texts that allow us to understand the origins Pages: Marjorie Pryse is a professor of English and women's studies at the University at Albany, SUNY. Among her books are American Women Regionalists, A Norton Anthology, coedited with Judith Fetterley, and Conjuring: Black Women, Fiction, and Literary Tradition, coedited with Hortense Spillers. American women regionalists a Norton anthology. PS W7 A48 Daughters of decadence: women writers of the fin de siècle / edited and introduced by Elaine Showalter. This study of African American women's roles in the suffrage movement breaks new ground. Rosalyn Terborg-Penn draws from many original documents to take a comprehensive look at the African American women who sought the right to vote. She discovers numerous Black suffragists previously unknown. Analyzing the women's own stories, she examines why they joined the woman suffrage .